Many people don’t eat enough fruit and vegetables, and at a population level we seem to score under par. However, I’ve noticed an interesting seasonal trend with some of my clients over summer. One where if they tend to be prone to metabolic issues like weight gain and blood sugar control these tend to spike; and the common thread is fruit.

This got me to investigate, how much fruit should you eat? Is there such thing as consuming too much, and if so, what is it?

 

How much fruit according to the Australian Dietary Guidelines

Now back in the 2000s there was a relatively successful campaign called “Go for 2 and 5” which educated us on the Australian Dietary Guidelines. This tells us how much fruit and vegetable we should be consuming. The evidence seems to show that as a population we should be aiming for 2 serves of fruit and 5 serves of vegetables per day.

We know that it was a successful campaign, as over the campaign period the awareness of these ads went from 20% to 70% of survey respondents (Department of Health & Ageing, 2007). Interesting though, while 94% of respondents were able to correctively give the fruit consumption guidelines of 2 or more serves per day, only 32% correctly gave the correct response of 5 or more serves of vegetables.

This got me thinking. Do we have a confirmation bias when it comes to fruit and vegetable consumption? By this I mean that we tend to hear the message that we should be eating more of the lovely sweet stuff. But ignore the message regarding boring old vegetables.

Perhaps we thought the message was go for 5 and 2 rather than 2 and 5?

So does excessive fruit consumption matter to our health?

At least if we look at the report published on the success of the Go for 2 and 5 campaign we see that people were already consuming the guidelines of two serves of fruit per day on average. While the average serves of vegetables scraped in at just over half of the guideline at 2.6 serves. Interestingly, while we already succeeded as a nation at consuming 2 serves of fruit 43% indicated that they planned on increasing their fruit consumption. Only 28% planned on increasing their vegetables.

Certainly this appears as though the message of eating more fruit was much more palatable to survey respondents.

So it doesn’t surprise me then when I see a dramatic spike in how much fruit some of my clients eat over summer. This amount for some was up to 5-10 serves per day. Now clinically we saw increases in 1-2 kg of weight and spikes in blood sugar levels, even though these clients were doing what they thought was best for their health. They have listened to part of the message (the part which is most palatable for us sweet tooths!) and simply didn’t consider that you might be able to have too much fruit!

In summer we tend to have an explosion of seasonal fruit to the market. Stone fruits, melons, and tropical fruits all tend to hit our grocery stores at a cheaper price. Interestingly, all of my clients who have drastically increased their consumption of fruits over summer had a stone fruit tree such as peaches and nectarines in their backyard.

 

So how much fruit should you eat per day?

Well that depends on what you may want to prevent health wise, but somewhere between 2-3 serves per day seems to be the “sweet spot”. If you want to know the science to this conclusion, and what fruits tend to work best for you, please read part two of this blog!

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