I’m writing this blog in light of an article I read recently on Daily Mail.com about exercise and pregnancy. It caught my attention because it was headlining that mothers should wait SIX MONTHS before running or doing strenuous exercise after child birth! Now, that is actually outrageous. For such a big media platform, this article is going to reach hundreds of thousands of people, and could very easily become an earnest belief for many pregnant women. Right in the middle of physical inactivity and health epidemic.

Why am I being told not to exercise?

The article stems from women’s health physiotherapists who often treat issues arising from high impact exercise done too soon after birth. Activities like running can play three times your body weight on your pelvic floor, which is in a vulnerable state after childbirth. If it’s not rehabilitated correctly (like when we experience any tissue damage), it can lead to a prolapse of the vagina, bladder and/or bowel. Women’s health physiotherapists have launched a campaign called ‘Pelvic Roar’ to raise awareness of pelvic health – which is the real issue here; awareness.

The exercise should change as you change, not stop

Our bodies don’t spring back from carrying a small human overnight. Our capacity to lift, contract, bend, stretch and even brace, will not be the same as it was before pregnancy. Hitting that pump class at the gym or bootcamp on Saturday morning’s probably isn’t a wise idea. Your body needs time to rehabilitate the muscles, tendons and ligaments that have all stretched to carry your little one. This takes specific and targeted exercises as everyone’s bodies will go through a different pregnancy journey, and will require different physical care. Exercises need to be modified and adapted as your body changes, and it’s hard to know how to do that on your own. It’s always a good idea to consult your doctor and when possible work with a clinically trained exercise professional.

Education of the effects, benefits and risks of exercise at all stages of pregnancy needs to be improved for all medical and health professionals who come into contact with new mothers. Hopefully then movement can be endorsed and embraced, with the emphasis on safety and individualisation.

5 reasons you SHOULD exercise while you’re pregnant:

If you like to consult the literature, like I do, and see what the science says; you will find a whole lot of positive evidence that supports doing exercise throughout and after your pregnancy. If you’re active before you fall pregnant it is safe to stay active during your pregnancy.

Engaging in light resistance training and aerobic exercise in the second and third trimester showed no negative effects on the risk of pre-term labour, mode of delivery, gestational age or newborn health. In fact, exercising during pregnancy had some positive effects by reducing prevalence of hypertensive and gestational diabetes and helped control excess weight gain throughout pregnancy. Potentially these factors combined with the strength, endurance and overall muscle health that is maintained during pregnancy, exercising is associated with a shorter first stage of labour. Pre- and post-natal depressive symptoms are significantly reduced with exercise,

What’s the next step?

Closer collaboration desperately needs to happen between healthcare professionals such as GPs, nurses, obstetricians, physios, exercise physiologists and fitness professionals. We need to encourage, empower and educate women who are trying to get pregnant, are pregnant or are recovering from pregnancy to exercise. But to exercise right!

If you’re currently pregnant, trying to get pregnant, know someone who is pregnant or have recently had your little one, please ask your health professionals about how you can safely make exercise work for you – or give us a call! Every pregnancy is different, it is important to seek advice from your doctor and to train with an appropriately qualified exercise professional, such as an exercise physiologist.

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