The 7 Best Upper Body Exercises (Or, My Favorite Upper Body Exercises)

The 7 Best Upper Body Exercises (Or, My Favorite Upper Body Exercises)

In this article I outlined what I think are the best 7 upper body exercises on the planet. Seriously, give them a go and watch the gains come rolling in!

Only last week I wrote an article outlining my 7 favorite lower body exercises.

So I figured I might as well do the same with some upper body exercises.

As I alluded to in that previous article, I have been training my upper body for a fairly long time (much longer than my lower body, to be honest…).

The term ‘meathead’ would be an apt description.

However, because of this, I have had the opportunity to experiment with a number of different exercises over the years. Some of which I have found some to be much better than others.

It is these exercises that I have then used with my clients (with great success, I might add) — and it is these exercises that I am now passing onto you.

So, without further ado — and in no particular order — what I believe to be the 7 best upper body exercises.

 

1. Landmine Press

Boy oh boy do I love me a landmine press.

While this great exercises is not as sexy as a bench press, nor as handsome as a bicep curl, it does offer one serious point of difference.

Functionality.

The landmine press is one of the few exercises that allows your shoulder blade to move freely during the pressing motion, and therefore replicating how it acts in real world settings.

This has obvious carryover to tasks of daily living and a myriad of upper body performance tasks (things like throwing comes to mind).

As a bonus, because the landmine can move laterally, this exercise also improves shoulder stability. This is important, as it can directly enhance shoulder health, while also preventing injuries.

Oh, and I should also mention that because your shoulder moves freely during this movement, it is super shoulder friendly — making it perfect for those of you with cranky shoulders.

 

2. Inverted Row

The inverted row is one of the few exercises that feature in most of my clients programs, most of the time.

And for good reason too.

The inverted row is a horizontal rowing variation that targets all of the muscles of the upper back. This makes it perfect for improving posture and reversing many of the nasty side effects that come with sitting.

As an added bonus, it can be performed on a number of different pieces of equipment, including in a squat rack, on a smith machine, or even using a TRX.

 

3. Push Up

You didn’t expect me to leave the push up off this list did you?

Good — because I simply couldn’t.

Like the landmine press, the push up allows your shoulder to move freely, which makes it very shoulder friendly.

With this in mind, when performed properly, the push up offers a great way to improve should stability, as well enhance core endurance and increase upper body strength.

The trick lies with making sure you perform them properly…

And finally, they can also be loaded easily with the addition of weight plates and bands (so no, they are not just a ‘beginner’ exercise…).

 

4. Single Arm Dumbbell Row

I have a very special place in my heart for dumbbell rows.

Not only are they a great way to increase upper body strength, enhance shoulder function, and improve posture (all simultaneously), but I am pretty sure they are the reason I put any muscle on my upper back when I first started training.

And really, isn’t that enough?

I personally like performing dumbbell rows with both feet firmly planted on the ground, while supporting my upper body on a bench. When done in this way they also increase core engagement, which can only be a good thing.

 

5. Chin Up

I can picture it now.

The year is 2036, and the zombie apocalypse is finally upon us. I sprint through the streets. Lungs burning, I seek any means of escape. A thousand pair of feet shuffle quickly behind me. Groans fill the air. The taste of fear is thick in my mouth.

The cold embrace of death inches closer by the second.

Then I see it.

Down an alley way to my left, a small balcony. Slightly above head height — I think I can make it.

I turn sharply, moving down the alley as fast as I can.

Launching myself up towards the ledge, I panic — I’m not going to make it.

Somehow my fingers make contact.

I manage to hang on.

With my feet scrambling and my heart pounding, I drag myself up, arms screaming all the while.

As I slide the final few inches, I feel a hand scrape the bottom of my shoe.

The angry shrieks of the undead ring in my ears.

I will live another day.

Thanks to chin ups.

In all seriousness, being able to perform even a single chin up with solid technique is a clear demonstration of upper body strength. It also means that you can control your own body through space, which is important when it comes to managing life on a daily basis.

More importantly, the chin up itself is great way to train all the muscles of your back, and it improves core stability.

In short, it makes you a strong and resilient human being.

 

 

6. Dumbbell Bench Press

I simply could not do it — I had to chuck in a bench press variation.

And while the dumbbell bench press is not quite as snazzy as a traditional barbell bench, it is arguably a much more readily available alternative.

The dumbbell bench press allows you to keep your shoulders in a nice neutral position, which makes it very shoulder friendly.

More importantly, it trains the muscles of the chest and hammers the triceps — so you know, beach muscles and stuff.

The strength developed in the bench press has a lot of carryover to various tasks of daily living (like getting yourself up from the floor) and a number of athletic based movements (think of Dustin Martins don’t argue).

In  short, its good.

Yeah, I guess I’m a fan.

 

7. Single Arm Cable Row

And last (but certainly not least) we have the single arm cable row.

If you have ever trained at iNform, then there is a very good chance that you have done one of these bad boys during a session.

They not only offer a great way to train all the muscles of your back, but they also require you to rotate your thoracic spine. This improves your thoracic mobility, which can help enhance shoulder health and reduce lower back pain.

Importantly, as the exercise is unilateral (AKA uses one arm at a time), it is also perfect for ironing out any strength asymmetries you may have.

Talk about bang-for-your-buck.

 

Take Home Message

And boom — there you have it — 7 of the best upper body exercises on the planet.

Chuck these in your program and watch all the gain train come rolling in.

About the Author

Outlifting Osteoporosis: Is Weight Training Good for Your Bones?

Outlifting Osteoporosis: Is Weight Training Good for Your Bones?

Is weight training good for your bones? Yes, it certainly is — if you implement it optimally of course. So find out how you can!

Over the last couple of weeks I have written a couple of articles describing how and why weight training is good for your joints (check them out here and here).

So I thought I might as well keep that ball rolling and answer a question that comes up more often than you might think: “is weight training good for your bones?”

 

What You Need to Know About Bone Health

Keeping your bones healthy and strong is pretty damn important.

I mean, if they become weak and brittle, then you are going to be at a much higher risk of incurring bone fractures and breaks.

Now this obviously not a good thing.

In fact, it can be an absolutely terrible thing.

I mean, while a fractured bone will be an uncomfortable experience for most, it can be a literal death sentence for some individuals (particularly those entering their golden years).

So, to put it simply, strong bones = healthy life.

 

Bone Health and Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a disease is typified by a significant reduction in bone density.

This occurs when your rate of bone production is outweighed by your rate of bone degradation (which i should mention is a normal process). In this scenario, your bones will become weak and brittle, in which you become much more susceptible to breaks and fractures.

Not good…

But here is the really scary thing: osteoporosis affects more than 700,000 Australians over 50 nationwide.

And no, that is not a typo.

More than 700,000.

For those of you playing at home, that’s a helluva lot of people.

 

Fighting Osteoporosis

Now, the good news is that osteoporosis (and the decline in bone density that precedes it) is not a death sentence.

In fact, there is a growing body of research clearly demonstrating that exercise can have a seriously positive impact on the health of your bones.

And of those types of exercise that appear to have the most benefit?

Well, encase the title of the article didn’t give it way, weight training appears to be king.

 

 

Is Weight Training Good for Your Bones?

Amazingly, progressive weight training has been shown to cause steady increases in bone mineral density. Importantly, this occurs in:

  • Healthy individuals,
  • People with diagnosed osteoporosis
  • Those at a high risk of developing osteoporosis

So, by simply weight training a few times per week, you can see some huge increases in your bone health.

This is not only going to significantly reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis in the long run, but will also limit your likelihood of experiencing bone breaks and fractures.

 

Optimising Weight Training to Improve Bone Health

You now know that weight training is the key to increasing the health of your bones. But there a few things that need to be considered here:

  • Heavy loads appear better at stimulating bone growth than lighter loads
  • Free weights that place load on the lower limbs and the spine appear most effective
  • You need to progressively increase loads as you get stronger, to continually force adaptation
  • Three sessions per week appears optimal

If you manage to adhere to these general rules, you can be guaranteed that you will see some good improvements in bone density.

 

Take Home Message

So, is weight training good for you bones? Yessir, it certainly is.

If you implement it optimally, of course.

With this in mind, weight training is something that should be performed by all individuals — especially those looking to improve bone health and stave off osteoporosis.

About the Author

Three Reasons Why You Should Exercise With An Expert.

Three Reasons Why You Should Exercise With An Expert.

    It would be rhetorical to say: that your body is special. And you would only want the best to be guiding you through your health and well-being safely. And yet, one can still be suggestible- picking up dodgy anecdotal tips from ‘that guy’ on the lat-pull-down machine.
    • I have personally experienced the exercise benefits, being safely loaded, and moving with confidence with one of my colleagues. Leaving my body and surrendering to an expert has given myself a deeper appreciation of the importance of finding an expert in human movement.

 

    I have always been on the other side to what I have been accustomed too- and as bias as it sounds: my colleagues here at iNform health really know how to manage and care for their clients.

Here are three reasons why you should be exercising with an expert.

 

1. Your tissues need time to adapt to load. 

Your tissues, all the way down to the extracellular matrix- are for ever adapting to stressors and making proteins. Prescribing appropriate load- will ensure ones tissues will safely adapt; which will add a host of benefits to ones neuromuscular system. Reduced risk of tendonopathies, appropriate motor learning and myonuclei growth (muscle hypertrophy). On the contrary, excessive loading that exceeds the capacity of the neuromuscular system can induce the contra effects to the aforementioned. Tendon pathology, disorganised motor learning due to inappropriate load and systemic inflammation (abnormal prostaglandin levels) due to poor tissue healing.

 

2. Assessing the capacity of the neuromuscular system before undertaking load is paramount- and if neglected, your ‘health professional’ is going in blind. 

If there is a muscle inhibition due to de-conditioned tissues, or a previous pathology that was poorly rehabilitated, would you feel safe to be loaded? Or if you were unable to co-contract your gluteus maximums, or have adequate lumbo-pelvic control? And yet, you may still be subjected to axial loading in your first session…! A thorough musculoskeletal assessment can identify any red flags and give your health professional valuable subjective/objective information to prescribe appropriate exercise correctives.  This will then ensure more complex movements are performed safely.

 
3. Co-care is so important in addressing the whole individual. 

Here at iNform, our clients are closely monitored by a wonderful internal/external team of allied health professionals; ranging from: GP’s, physio’s, osteo’s, chiros, pod’s and psychologist (without exhausting). All working and communicating together for the greater good of your physical and mental health. Co-care leads to better clinical outcomes, a proper working diagnosis, and the right form of treatments that benefit you the individual.

So, next time you are wanting to move with confidence. Be interrogative with your research. Find an evidence based approach that doesn’t involve a lecture from ‘that guy’ wearing a weight belt with a skimpy muscle singlet (stereotyping much?).

About The Author

 
 
Fitness Loss Over The Christmas Break: What You Should Know About Detraining

Fitness Loss Over The Christmas Break: What You Should Know About Detraining

The holiday season is fast approaching, organized sports are coming to a halt, work is winding up and many of us are embarking upon holidays. The Christmas break is a time where we are often given the opportunity to reconnect with friends and family while having a break from a regular schedule. While this opportunity to recharge may be necessary, it can also be to the detriment of any fitness progress and goals you have achieved throughout the passing year. Fitness loss is commonplace, not only during the Christmas holidays but during any extended period of reduced physical activity and we often refer to this effect as detraining.

 

Detraining and the Residual Training Effect:

Lets talk about detraining, you may have heard about it somewhere along the grapevine or maybe you have had first-hand experience with it, most likely the latter. The relationship between detraining and the residual training effect revolves around the idea that after cessation of training or an acute reduction in volume the body begins physiological processes which slowly untie any positive adaptations to training we may have made (detraining/deconditioning). It is these physiological characteristics that when grouped together make up what we call fitness components. These components include speed, maximal strength, aerobic endurance, strength endurance and anaerobic endurance. Now, while these may not all relate to you, there are most likely one or two which are inclusive in your fitness goals (no matter how basic or specific they are).

However, it may not be all doom and gloom. It is important to know that not all of these characteristics deteriorate at the same rate, some are much more resilient to detraining than others.

The table below gives an outline of how long the physiological adaptations are maintained during a period of detraining.

 

The Residual Training Effect

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What effects the residual training effect?

  1. Duration of training before reduction or cessation
  2. Training age and physical experience
  3. Intensity used during the detraining period (moderate to high-intensity exercise reduces rate)

You may be asking “how does this relate to me?”

As shown in the table above we can see that speed is the most susceptible to change (2-8 days), whereas maximal strength and aerobic endurance are the most resilient (25-35 days). If your goals are to maintain speed and strength endurance it would be counterproductive to completely stop training, these components would best be maintained with a few short sprint and full body hypertrophy sessions during the break. Whereas if your goals are to maintain maximum strength and aerobic endurance; While it would not be ideal to completely stop training, the reduction in training volume would not have such a detrimental effect as the components mentioned previously.

 

So what should you take out of this? 

  • Try to integrate some moderate to high-intensity training into your break to slow down these detraining effects.
  • Short sessions with a focus on the components that are most susceptible to change or relate closest to goals are recommended.
  • Sports where repeated sprint ability (RSA) is critical to performance (AFL, Soccer, Basketball), should focus training on sport-specific needs for the athlete and include short sprint sessions. There is not a great need to prescribe or complete long aerobic/anaerobic endurance sessions during the break where time is often scarce.
  • Reflect on your current and previous goals and how this concept relates to you if you are planning on taking a break.

About The Author

Diet Damage Control: Stop the Christmas Blowout

Diet Damage Control: Stop the Christmas Blowout

With Christmas around the corner, we are entering a period of overwhelming enjoyment.

Days off work, weekends that are filled with staff shows and family functions, and of course lunches and dinners with friends.

How good is it?

But, as always, there is a small negative associated.

Namely the fact that we have a tendency to go absolutely crazy across the entire Christmas period, throwing caution to the wind, and eating our weight in goodies.

Now don’t get me wrong – I am a firm believer that a bad meal isn’t going to derail your progress.

A single piece of fruit isn’t going to make you skinny, and a single donut isn’t going to make you fat. As we all know, it is the accumulation of good habits that keeps us healthy, while alternatively, its the accumulation of not so good habits that makes us unhealthy.

However, despite knowing this full well, we as humans seem to love a good blowout.

I’ll use myself as an example.

 

The Cadbury Effect

I am a sucker for chocolate.

I have a ridiculous sweet tooth, and to be completely honest, chocolate is my proverbial kryptonite.

Interestingly, my wife and I could have an unopened block of chocolate in the fridge for the better part of a year, and I wont touch the thing. However, if we were to open it, I can guarantee that it will be gone within the hour.

Now, I realize that this doesn’t really make sense, but the reason I do this is to get rid of it.

Somewhere in the depth of my subconscious, I think to myself: ‘stuff it, I’ve already blown it, I might as well eat the whole thing‘.

Clever?

Nope.

Logical?

Still nope.

Common?

Unfortunately, yes.

We know it doesn’t make sense, but we still do it every damn time.

Not just for chocolate either (which is still not great) – we as humans have a tendency to do it for absolutely everything.

Even things that last for days or weeks at a time…

The Christmas Blowout

When it comes to Christmas, things can go downhill pretty fast.

A bad afternoon can easily turn into a very bad weekend. And that weekend can very easily roll into an extremely bad week.

All of which comes down to that same mindset.

“Welp, Ive blown it – ill get back on track after new years…”

Extremely common, and extremely stupid.

All in all I completely understand where we are coming from, but that doesn’t make this mindset any less flawed.

We know that one single afternoon of eating and drinking isn’t going to derail a years worth of progress.

Hell, outside of a little bit of bloating and a potential stomach ache, the likelihood of this single night doing any lasting damage is pretty slim.

But two weeks of eating, drinking, and being merry?

That’s when the damage starts to accumulate.

 

Diet Damage Control

So in my mind, diet damage control over Christmas comes down to mindset.

Take a step back and realize that a single meal isn’t going to derail all of your hard work and progress.

Enjoy that meal as much as humanly possible. Be social, drink, and be happy.

But don’t let it become a two week binge.

Keep physically active (as normal) over the Christmas period.

Eat as you normally would outside of those key social situations.

And enjoy the time off!

About The Author

 

 

 

 

Train Smarter Not Harder: Evidence to Support the iNform Way

Train Smarter Not Harder: Evidence to Support the iNform Way

I can certainly appreciate that the words ‘train smarter not harder’ do indeed come across a little gimmicky – but that certainly doesn’t make them any less appropriate.

For those of you who are aware of the iNform way, you would understand the premium we place on quality movement.

Our process always starts with the identification of movement dysfunction and muscular imbalances. We can then prioritize your training to improve upon these identified issues, therefore causing lasting improvements in how well you move. This process essentially acts as the foundation from which you can commence your performance journey – ultimately setting you up for future training success, exponentially increasing your physical capabilities, all while simultaneously reducing your risk of injury.

Pretty cool, right?

There is (or as of now, was) however, a little bit of kicker.

While each and every one of us here are iNform have always had a firm belief that this process worked, and worked well (and had the anecdotal evidence to prove it), we didn’t really have a method of quantifying it.

Well, until now, that is.

 

Train Smarter Not Harder

So, for those of you in the know, I am currently undertaking a PhD at the University of South Australia, where I am looking at the associations between movement quality and physical performance.

In short, I am testing out the effectiveness of the iNform methodology.

Now don’t get me wrong – I am well aware that this could have been disastrous. Imagine spending three years of my life trying to prove something that iNform have been building for the better part of two decades, and then seeing it fail.

And it all comes crashing down.

Like I said, disastrous.

However, as you might have guessed (given the title of this post and all), this wasn’t the case.

In fact, the key training study that I am going to be talking about genuinely smashed all expectations out of the park.

While I wont give you all the boring details (especially since the study is yet to be published), I will give you a bit of a rundown of what we did, and what the results were – and I can only assume that you will be as impressed as I was…

 

A Big Tick For Movement Quality

Pretty simply, we recruited a bunch of people into the study who had a fair amount of gym experience (about 6 years on average). We then took them through a battery of tests. These included iNforms MovementSCREEN assessment of movement quality, the FMS (another assessment of movement quality), and a number of strength and power measures.

To be honest, it was pretty comprehensive (and fairly time consuming…).

We then split the participants into two evenly matched groups.

One group underwent a training program built around the results of their individual movement assessment. This training was designed to improve upon any pre-identified movement dysfunctions and muscle imbalances (we can call these guys the iNform group). The second group underwent a training program built around the recommend guidelines for resistance training. This was done with intent to improve strength and physical capabilities (we will cause these guys the strength group).

Both groups underwent two (both 60 minutes long) training sessions per week for a total duration of 8 weeks. They were also fully supervised, with their training regime provided by a trainer in a one-on-one setting. At the end of each training session we also took a measure to determine how challenging the participants perceived the training.

Now it is important to note that the strength group weren’t simply performing some trashy cookie cutter program – it was still tailored to their individual capabilities, and it was built around training guidelines set by The American College of Sports Medicine.

It pretty much perfectly replicated what you would normally see in a normal personal training setting.

Which is why the results were so damn exciting (or at least, we think they are).

The Results

After the 8 weeks of training, we took all the participants through the same baseline testing battery. This allowed us to compare any differences between the two groups, and establish what method of training caused greater improvement in movement quality and performance.

Now to be completely honest, I did have a couple of expectations coming into this.

I really thought that the iNform group would see larger improvements in movement quality, while the strength group would see greater improvements in physical performance. Which in my mind, would make sense.

But that isn’t quite what happened.

The strength group saw large improvements in both their MovementSCREEN score of movement quality and their physical performance measures. With this, their FMS score of movement quality remained for the most part the same.

Interestingly, the iNform group saw the same degree of improvement in their strength and power measures. In conjunction with this, they saw greater improvements in their measures of movement quality.

Which in itself is pretty damn cool.

However, things start to get even more interesting when we start to look at how challenging the participants viewed their training…

You see, the iNform group found their training program significantly less difficult than the strength group. In fact, they rated every single session easier than the strength training group did.

Which suggests that they got better movement quality improvements and comparable performance improvements for less effort.

 

What The?

To be completely honest, these results took us somewhat by surprise. Not that we didn’t have faith in our processes, but the degree in which the iNform group improved their performance was pretty high – comparable to what most would consider the gold standard method of training.

Moreover, considering that this came with much less perceived effort, well its pretty outrageous really.

While we cant be sure why this happened, we suspect that it was because the iNform method of training is more ‘targeted’. It revolves around identifying the weakest link in the chain (or in this case, the body), and then training to improve that weakest link.

So although the method of training may be less intense than traditional strength training methods, it really works on what needs to be worked on.

Which obviously leads to improvements in performance and movement quality.

 

Take Home Message

I guess what we are trying to say is that the iNform way works. We now have evidence to support it, which we will be sharing in its entirety as soon as its published.

But what does this mean for you?

Well in my mind it clearly shows that training with iNform can improve how well you move, while simultaneously increasing your strength and power. Moreover, you will find this method of training less challenging than ‘traditional, training methods.

Train smarter not harder.

Simple.