My 5 Favourite Types of Running (and where I do them in South Australia)

My 5 Favourite Types of Running (and where I do them in South Australia)

My Father-in-law absolutely loves wine. As long as it is a big, smooth Barossa Shiraz. I on the other hand like a bit of diversity- a cold, crisp Riesling on a hot summer’s day; a big brooding Cabernet on a cold wintry night; a Pinot, well, there are a lot of contexts where Pinot is appealing! It is much the same with running for me. Some people like to do the same 5km Park Run every week. Great! I however like to run in lot’s of different ways and contexts. So here are my top 5 types of run and where I enjoy doing them the most.

5: Flat Road Running

A long, straight, flat stretch of tarmac in front of me. Feet tapping away with the consistency of a metronome. Breathing in an easy rhythm- every 3rd foot strike. Mind clear,  basically meditating. Km’s ticking away without really noticing. This is running relaxation.

Where I do it: The Riverland; Yorke Peninsula (Around Port Broughton or Ardrossan).

4: Sprinting

From a crouched starting point, then accelerating up to top speed. Driving the knees forward, ripping the elbows back. Completely releasing the brakes. I am sure it feels more impressive than it looks, but in my mind I am flying. The lungs start to bite which is the cue to take the foot off the the accelerator. My legs gradually wind down. I let myself recover, then go again.

Where I do it: Balhannah Footy Oval; Amy Gillett Bikeway

3: Uphill

Yes I am serious, I love running uphill. As I approach the incline my mindset shifts. This hill will be like a big meal- just take your time with it and take it one mouthful at a time. I lean forward, focus on pulling my knees through, and get into a nice easy rhythm. I imagine the little engine that could; chug-chugging it’s way up the winding track. The revs are oscillating close to, but always under the red-line until the crest is spotted, then comes an acceleration. Relief as the gradient plateaus.

Where I do it: The (Old) South Eastern Freeway; ‘The Guts’ Track at Fox Creek.

2: Trails

I love narrow, rocky trails. If there is a steep drop-off on one side, excellent. Creek crossing, boulder hopping, ducking under low branches. It can be more like an obstacle course than a run. Agility and power are required to negotiate what the trails offers. One minute I am scampering up tight switch backs; next I am weaving down the other side like a slalom skier. This is an extreme sport!

Where I do it: Sturt Gorge; Morialta

1: Beach Running

This is running stripped (almost!) completely back. Barefoot, wearing just shorts and a hat. Along the shore line, the waves are the soundtrack. Always on a hot day. When the heat gets a bit much the hat gets chucked to one side and in the ocean I go. The first beach run of the summer results in blistered feet and sore calves- but both toughen up pretty quick. For me beach running is heaven.

Where I do it: Normanville to Carrickalinga; Aldinga Beach

I hope to see you out at one of my favourite spots!

About the Author

Get Fit for Travel

Get Fit for Travel

We all love to head away on holidays. My idea of a holiday may be quite different to someone else’s idea of a perfect getaway. Where some people like to unwind and relax on a European river cruise sipping Champagne and reading a good book, others may prefer a tropical beach holiday where they spend time swimming or meandering through the local markets. Many are more adventurous too. I myself like to get up and about, explore and be a little adventurous. If there is a good scenic hike to the top of a mountain on offer, I’ll probably do it. Regardless of the activities on the holiday there is still one thing that remains constant. There is a need to get fit for travel.

Why do you need to be fit for travel?

I think you would all agree that the last thing you want to do is injure yourself while on holiday or worse yet, before you even get to your destination. Travelling can inherently be stressful on the body in a number of ways. Physically, you are likely to have baggage to be lugging around to airports and hotels. You may want to get your carry-on baggage up into the overhead compartments on the plane and then back down again upon arrival. Take care because we all know your baggage may have moved during the flight! Most holidays do also end up involving a degree of exploration on foot to have a look at the sights and often just to get from place to place. All of these seemingly simple tasks still require a degree of strength and mobility. 

Moving away from tasks that need physical strength, let’s talk a little about physical health! A lack of physical health could lead to an increased chance of a cardiac event whilst overseas, that’s a real buzz kill! That’s looking worst case. On a lower level it may just be an inability to walk from place to place due to breathlessness or achy joints. Still a bit of a downer during a holiday.

If you are planning a more adventurous holiday, such as a multi-day trek in Nepal or a ski trip then this need for an appropriate fitness base is even greater. Essentially, you want to be sure that you have prepared yourself for the likely rigors of your holidays, regardless of the intended intensity.

How do you get fit for travel?

It’s not as hard as you may first think. If you are coming from a place of very little fitness, consider starting with small walks that challenge you slightly. This will start to build up some cardiovascular fitness and a base level of strength. Have a read of this blog, Strength Training for Walking to see how strength training could help you. As the walks become easier, you can start to increase the intensity over time. I would strongly advise some professional advice into strength work that will help build both lower and upper body strength. This will help you achieve all of the routine holiday tasks easily. 
If you happen to be embarking on an a more adventurous holiday, it is best to get some tailored advice for your individual needs. You will want to be doing more to increase strength and endurance.

Whether you are starting from scratch or need something more advanced, this is an area iNform Health and Fitness Solutions specialises in. We want you to get the most out of your travelling so come and visit us for some quality advice.   

Don’t miss the forest for the trees. Get fit for travel so that you can climb to the top of every lookout and see all that there is to see.

About the Author

22 benefits of an iNform session

22 benefits of an iNform session

What makes YOU exercise? (Other than your trainer)

We all know that exercise is good for us. Some of us exercise for particular reasons and to get certain benefits over others. Whilst some of us exercise with goals in mind like running a half marathon or just being able to pick up our grandkids. Or it might just be that this our time for ourselves each week. Whatever the reason you exercise, and whatever form of exercise you do, for whatever amount of time you do it for; I pat you on the back for the fact that you do it!

The World Health Organisation has released some fresh data last week showing almost one third (30.4%) of Australians aren’t getting enough exercise. Out of 168 countries, we ranked 97th for the % of population being sufficiently active. Which is scary considering physical inactivity is so highly associated with chronic health problems.

Just one type of exercise we do: Resistance Training (aka strength training or weight training)

This is what most clients at iNform typically spend the majority of their session doing. It can look like anything from body weighted strength, focusing on alignment and control, to lifting very heavy weights only a handful of times. The person that hasn’t broken a sweat all session, and the person that is drenched in sweat at the end of the session – have both engaged in strength training. It looks completely different for everyone. That’s the beautiful thing about strength training, it can be adapted and individualised just for you and your body’s specific needs.

For those who are reading this that are regulars at iNform, you will know better than anyone the effects that training with us has. Hopefully from brightening your mood and giving you a giggle, to helping increase your body awareness, getting you stronger and facilitating better movement throughout life’s activities. But for those who maybe don’t know all of the amazing benefits that strength training alone can have on your body; I have made a nerdy little list below. Please feel free to share this with your friends and family members who maybe aren’t quite convinced on exercise, there’s something in here for everyone!

Your 30 minute session at iNform…

Mentally

  • Improve focus
  • Improve cognitive function
  • Decrease anxiety
  • Decrease depressive symptoms
  • Improve feelings of well-being
  • Increases self-esteem
  • Decreases risk of dementia

Metabolically

  • Decrease markers of inflammation (particularly in people who are overweight)
  • Decrease cholesterol
  • Decrease blood pressure
  • Improve insulin-swings for those with type 2 diabetes
  • Improves insulin-sensitivity
  • Boosts metabolic rate
  • Reverse ageing factors in mitochondria and muscles

Musculoskeletally

  • Increases bone mineral density (and prevents bone loss)
  • Increases muscle mass
  • Improves movement control
  • Reduces chronic lower back pain
  • Reduces arthritic pain
  • Reduces pain from fibromyalgia

Functionally

And I guarantee I have left some benefits out.

How can you get all these benefits, plus more? (we didn’t even look at the benefits of aerobic exercise!)

If you would like to start getting more out of your resistance training sessions, or if you’re wanting to start resistance training but you have some niggles that bother you, I recommend getting in touch with one of our amazing movement specialists who can help find the right exercises for you!

If you would like more information on particular benefits and which study I sourced it from, feel free to email me at: [email protected]

About the Author

Do you have a balanced exercise-diet?

Do you have a balanced exercise-diet?

I love broccoli, it is my favourite food! I love it so much, it is all I eat- breakfast lunch and dinner. And it’s healthy hey, lots of vitamins and minerals. So yeah, just broccoli for me thanks.

Obviously this is ridiculous. I don’t think you need a degree in Dietetics to appreciate that we need diversity in our diet so we get all of the good stuff that our body needs to maintain health. Broccoli fits within a balanced diet- it is not a diet in itself.

What the heck does this have to do with exercise?

Behold, The Ten Domains of Fitness

  • Cardiovascular endurance
  • Stamina
  • Strength
  • Power
  • Speed
  • Flexibility
  • Coordination
  • Agility
  • Balance
  • Accuracy

In an ideal world, you would challenge these fitness domains on a regular basis to create a diverse range of stimuli to promote adaptation and optimal physical health. Do you?

What if you are a real Yoga devotee. That is all you do, and you do it regularly and you love it. Fantastic. You would be well honed in flexibility and balance and scratch the surface on strength and coordination.

What about if you are a runner? You run 10km every single day, awesome! You are challenging CV endurance and stamina, but probably very little else (in a meaningful way).

For the gym-junkies who just love to lift big weights? Strength. That is about it.

As an Exercise Physiologist, it is my hope that everyone can find a form of physical activity that they truly love and do on a regular basis. But if you are committed to becoming the best version of yourself that you can be, you need to challenge the other fitness domains regularly to give yourself a more balanced exercise diet. This can sound daunting- how the hell do I fit all of that into my already-busy schedule? This is how I do it.

  • I do a nice long run and/or mountain bike ride once per week. This takes care of CV endurance and stamina, as well as balance, coordination and accuracy (on the Mountain Bike).
  • I do one hill-rep running session per week which I do on some tricky, narrow, rocky trails around Burnside. This challenges power and speed on the way up, and agility on the way back down.
  • I do two gym sessions per week, where I always include strength work, power exercises and balance exercises.
  • Finally I like to stretch and foam-roll in the evenings when I am watching tv (ad breaks are great for this!).

Someone else may achieve all of these fitness domains in a week by playing netball, going for a hike up Mount Lofty, lifting weights at the gym and doing a Yoga class or two. It can take any number of different forms.

Our body thrives on a diverse diet of physical challenges. And our body (and mind) will adapt in amazing ways if we regularly nourish it with these challenges. iNform’s Exercise Physiologists are here to help you diversify your Exercise Diet and help you become the best version of yourself you can be.

About the Author

Exercise and Depression: 5 Tips to Move Your Mood!

Exercise and Depression: 5 Tips to Move Your Mood!

It’s natural and normal to feel depressed at times, particularly and especially when, life throws you a curve ball. Whether it’s the ending of a relationship, a death in the family, the loss of a job, or even just adjusting to different circumstances. Depression is a mood state, just like happy, excited or sad. Across the spectrum of symptoms, there are distinctly different types of depression. From not being able to eat or sleep, to eating too much and feeling too fatigued to even get out of bed. If depression was a colour it would come in all shades, in all colours.

Exercise and Depression: Nature’s Anti-depressant

A recent meta-analysis found that engaging in physical activity could reduce your chances of developing depression by 17%. We also know that typically exercise has a large effect on reducing symptoms of depression, and this includes activities like resistance training, yogabouldering (rock climbing), cycling, swimming and running. A well known study done in 1999 at Duke University even concluded that exercise was as effective as medication in relieving symptoms of depression!

Luckily exercise and physical activity also comes in a full spectrum of colours, too. From walking to work in the morning, or going for a run in your lunch break, to signing up for a yoga class or going to a boxing session with a mate. There is a type of exercise for everyone, and every type of exercise can be adapted to the intensity which you like best! You can exercise alone, or with a friend, or with a bunch of strangers. You can exercise indoors or outdoors. You can literally make it whatever you want!

I say all of this because I think the words ‘exercise’ or ‘physical activity’ bring to mind images of stereotypical types of exercise, like being in a gym or being outside running, which can put a lot of people off straight away. A better term to use would be movement. And our bodies were made to move, our physiology and particularly our neurophysiology (our brain) NEEDS us to move in order for us to feel good. (If you want to read more about this, read my stress blog).

Working Out Depression

Are you sure exercise is going to make me feel better…? (Yep!)

Biologically:

Exercise releases endorphins (anti-stress hormones), 40 types of them to be exact. One of the effects these have is that they calm the brain and relieve muscle pain during strenuous exercise (hence why Superman can lift cars up!). Exercise also regulates all of the same neurotransmitters targeted by antidepressants.

For starters, it immediately elevates norepinephrine, waking up the brain and getting it going. As well as improving self-esteem, which is one component of depression. Exercise boosts dopamine, which improves mood and feelings of wellness, and jump-starts the attention system. Dopamine is important because it is all about driving motivation and attention, that’s why they say getting started is the hardest part!

Exercise also increases BDNF which protects neurons against cortisol in areas that control mood, including the hippocampus. It encourages neurons to connect and grow, and it vital for neuroplasticity and neurogenesis (keeping our brain young and adaptable)!

Psychosocially:

In addition to feeling good when you exercise, you feel good about yourself, and that has a positive effect that can’t be traced to a particular chemical or area in the brain. We know that norepinephrine and serotonin, which are both boosted with exercise, act on the limbic system (the amygdala, the hypothalamus and the hippocampus) which is responsible for things like how we perceive and regulate our emotions. Even small doses of exercises are effective at improving peoples quality of life and psychosocial functioning.

The best exercises for reducing/preventing depressive symptoms are:

A recent study suggests that exercising between 3 and 5 times a week for 30-60 minutes is associated with better mental health, and team sports, cycling, aerobic and gym exercise came in at the top for types of exercise associated with better mental health.

Resistance training has also shown to have a large impact on reducing depressive symptoms, particularly when supervised by a health professional and lasting shorter than 45 minutes. You can read more on this in James’ blogs here and here.

If you’ve been feeling down and you start to exercise and feel better, the sense that you’re going to be OK and that you can count on yourself shifts your entire attitude. The stability of the routine alone can dramatically improve mood. So next time you feel flat do the smart thing, the thing that future you will appreciate, and move your body (even if it’s just out of the house!). And if motivation or accountability is the issue, why not train with an Exercise Physiologist or another qualified health professional?

Exercise is not an instant cure, but if you move your body your mood basically won’t have a choice!

Tips:

  • It’s important to keep expectations reasonable
  • Exercise outside, or in an environment that stimulates your senses
  • Exercise with somebody
  • Something is better than nothing!
  • Try to form an exercise routine – this adds to feelings of stability

About the Author

5 Keys to Good Heart Health

5 Keys to Good Heart Health

Cardiovascular risk factors are well known to increase one’s risk of a stroke, and or vascular dementia. There is a lot one can do to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke and maintain great heart health. I am sure you would like to know the evidence based risk factors for the aforementioned?

What are the risk factors for CVD and stroke?

In a recent paper published in the journal JAMA: Williamson et al used modifiable, evidence based risk factors in young adults (18-40 years) whom without any known evidence of  cerebrovascular disease. To investigate using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), if subjects brains were showing early signs of cerebrovascular disease. Cardiovascular risk factors that were measured ranged from: body mass index <25, cardiovascular fitness, alcohol consumption >8 drinks/week, non-smoker >6 months, blood pressure >130/80 mm Hg, cholesterol and fasting glucose.

What were the findings?

Each of the aforementioned risk factors were assigned a rating of 1, in a 8 point scale (8 separate risk factors). Scoring higher was inferred as having a low risk of cerebrovascular disease. Subjects that had more clinical risk factors (< 2 points), did show some early signs of cerebrovascular disease on MRI (1). Researchers found white matter hyperintensities, which are lesions contributing to demyelination of important neural fiber tracts in the central nervous system in subjects with <2 points. What does this mean? less connectivity = slower brain processes (executive functioning, working memory et cetera). For 18-40 year olds showing clinical signs this early- intervening with evidence based modalities would benefit the individual greatly.

So, how do I reduce the risk of developing cerebrovascular disease?

First of all- DON’T PANIC! although published in a reputable journal, the paper was a preliminary study, with further longitudinal studies required with a larger sample that is ethnically diverse. HOWEVER, all of the mentioned cardiovascular risk factors can be modifiable. The following 5 key points will get you in the right direction to good heart health!

Aerobic exercise: following the physical activity guidelines with 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week. If you are sedentary >8 hours per day: aim for 75 minutes of accumulated physical activity per day.

High intensity interval training: 1-2 sessions per week, following an evidence based protocol, with guidance from your exercise physiologist and GP. Three 7-10 second sprints with a balanced work to rest ratio is suffice according to the literature.

Strength Training: 2-3 strength training sessions a week with accordance of the Exercise Sport Science Australia guidelines, with guidance from an accredited professional.

Sleep: although I am not a sleep physiologist, there is ample evidence relating poor sleep <6 hours/per night with CVD and insulin resistance. Sleeping 7-8 hours per night with optimal sleep hygiene is recommended by experts.

Nutrition: again, without being a nutritional expert: following evidence based guidelines (CSIRO), will ensure targeted bloods are met and there is less plaque build-up (atherosclerosis).

So there you go peeps! So many preventative ways you can keep your brain tissue myelinated! And your cardiovascular system in good “heart health”.

James

About the Author

Reference.

  1. Williamson, W., Lewandowski, A., Forkert, N., Griffanti, L., Okell, T., Betts, J., Boardman, H., Siepmann, T., McKean, D., Huckstep, O., Francis, J., Neubauer, S., Phellan, R., Jenkinson, M., Doherty, A., Dawes, H., Frangou, E., Malamateniou, C., Foster, C. and Leeson, P. (2018). Association of Cardiovascular Risk Factors With MRI Indices of Cerebrovascular Structure and Function and White Matter Hyperintensities in Young Adults. JAMA, 320(7), p.665.