7 Surprising Benefits of Exercise for Menopause

7 Surprising Benefits of Exercise for Menopause

Menopause. 

 

Every single woman on the planet will experience it during their 45 – 55’s. If you asked two different women, they’d tell you two different versions of what menopause was like. That’s because although the symptoms are common, not everyone experiences menopause in the same way….

 

Symptoms of Menopause

 

Not to worry though, there is something you can do to help manage your symptoms and help you through this change in your life.

 

The 7 Benefits of Exercise for Menopause!

 

Exercise has been shown to provide several health benefits whilst you are going through menopause. Exercise can…

 

1. Help Manage Symptoms! (Woohoo!)

 

Exercise can actually help to manage and reduce some of the symptoms of menopause such as; aches and pains, loss of libido, and fatigue. Increasing physical activity will result in a positive cycle of feeling better, which will increase motivation to exercise, making you feel better, and so on. You’ll end up feeling better on the inside and out!

 

2. Boost your Mood!

 

Women going through menopause commonly struggle with mood changes, anxiety, depression, and stress due to the hormonal changes within their bodies. However, exercise can increase positive mood and also protect against anxiety and depression.

 

Happy

 
3. Prevent Weight Gain!

 

Due to changes in hormone levels during menopause women may find they gain weight more easily than before (especially around the belly). Exercise and healthy eating is a great way to reduce weight and prevent any extra kilo’s creeping on.

 

4. Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Disease!

 

Oestrogen plays a protective mechanism against cardiovascular disease. During menopause, oestrogen is reduced which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Incorporating exercise into your daily routine can strengthen your heart and reduce risk of heart disease

 

5. Reduce Risk of Osteoporosis!

 

Oestrogen also plays an important role in maintaining bone density. The reduced oestrogen production during menopause can lead to decreased bone density, and thus increase the risk of osteoporosis. Exercise can strengthen bones and muscles, and improve balance reducing the risk of fractures due to falls.

 

Bone Health

 

6. Reduce Risk of Diabetes!

 

Changes in hormone levels during menopause can also affect the way your body reacts to insulin, potentially leading to diabetes. Exercise helps the body respond to insulin and remove excess blood sugars reducing the risk of developing diabetes.

 

7. Help Maintain Physical Function!

 

As our bodies age they start to decline in physical function (loss of muscle, loss of bone, decrease in balance, etc). Exercise is the perfect way to keep up your function and ability to continue to live the life you love. (And run around after your energetic little grandchildren!)

 

Awesome right?! You don’t have to just deal with this change you’re going through… There is something YOU can do to help yourself through it! 

 

General Exercise Guidelines 

150 mins of moderate exercise a week (or 30 mins a day over 5 days)

OR

75 mins of vigorous activity a week

AND

2-3x strength training days a week (non-consecutive days)

 

About the Author

How Routine Can Manage Change: Part Two

How Routine Can Manage Change: Part Two

My previous blog discussed admitting to my grief along with finding practical ways to contract skeletal tissue throughout the day. I want to build on from my previous blog, discuss routine and the importance to establish one during these times.

Whether inadvertent or not, you’ll have some form of routine. Routine maintains a strong sense of order and control which is definitely not obsessive or compulsive. More so, having your morning routine structured, along with a neat and organised environment decreases time wasting and increases efficiency.

When my routine was initially disrupted there was a sense of entropy which bought on a feeling of unease. I am now almost three weeks into my new morning routine. I’d like to share with you all what my morning now looks like. This may or may not provide some useful strategies to implement into your day. However, I am being a little bias to suggest that one or two of my morning rituals are very helpful! And of course evidence based!

Here we go:

4:30 am – arise

4:35 am – caffeine

4:40 am – Coronacast on RN (staying iNformed) along with a short stoic meditation podcast to increase my focus and drive for the day.

4:55 am – Twenty minutes of stretching for specific muscle groups that are restricting my mobility. Each stretch is timed with a countdown to enhance efficiency and maintain structure.

5:15 am – Four sets of 40-30 single leg calf raises (my calf’s are weak!) and I have Raynaud’s phenomenon.

5:25 am – Thirty minutes of guided meditation using the Ten Percent Happier app. (My morning meditation is working on good intentions for the day along with prolonged exhaling)

6:00am – Shower, dress, floss and brush my teeth.

6:20 am – Check emails and social media (social media time is restricted, which I’ll elaborate on)

So the above is now my new morning routine. I realise that not everyone is going to have the time that I have to dedicate to this. However, I strongly advocate that by creating calmness and stillness which ultimately is called mindfulness, you will greatly enhance mood, reduce blood pressure, increase creativity and so forth for the day ahead. Lastly, I found great benefit by delaying checking my emails and social media accounts until all of the aforementioned had been completed. I found that I was spending inappropriate amounts of time on social media trying to feel connected. When on reflection I was feeling more disconnected, whilst wasting time and thus not being productive. You may have noticed that I haven’t included any physical activity. I am exercising in the afternoons now. However, a brisk morning walk is highly valuable and a mindfulness activity in its own right!

 

In conclusion, if your routine has gone awry as mine did? I encourage you to plan and structure a productive routine to start your day. You won’t regret it!

James

About the Author

Aerobic fitness is your best health predictor. Should it be the focus of your time investment?

Aerobic fitness is your best health predictor. Should it be the focus of your time investment?

What would you say if I told you that there’s a health component that is more important for healthy ageing than the COMBINED effects of smoking, obesity, and  diabetes?? Yet, the average GP is unlikely to mention this to you, much less actually test it. Could they be missing one of the most important assessments they should be taking at your check up? and consequently, not giving you some of the best health advice you could be getting?? Ok, enough with the cryptic questions. This is going to be a short but powerful article, because I know you don’t have time to waste. The answer to these questions is aerobic fitness. That’s right, your aerobic fitness is your best health predictor and effector. Not sure how, or if, you should tackle this? Read on!

Aerobic Fitness is your best health predictor

The graph below shows the highly significant effect that cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF, or aerobic fitness) has on premature death, particularly with its effect compared to other more commonly discussed health issues. I am truly baffled that while this SHOULD be common knowledge to health and medical professionals, they rarely apply it as part of their assessment or targeted treatment!

Aerobic fitness is your best health predictor

Attributable fractions (%) for all cause deaths in over 53000 participants in the Aerobics Centre Longitudinal Study. This is an estimate of the number of deaths in a population that would have been avoided if a specific risk factor had been absent. That is, if all smokers were non-smokers or all inactive persons were
getting 30 minutes of walking on at least 5 days of the week.

Effect of increasing fitness

Sure, you have been advised by your health professional that you should introduce exercise in your life… that you should get out for a walk or two during the week. The graph below shows us two critical things about this advice. First is the obvious difference in protective effect of general physical activity vs fitness. You are busy, and ‘exercise time’ is hard to schedule, so the last thing we want is for you to not get the best possible return on your time investment! This data show the multiplied protective effect that increasing your fitness has on your health compared to just ‘being active’. While your low level general incidental activity is important, having a focused and safe approach to improving your fitness will reap huge returns on your investment.

Second, if you don’t know where to start, this data show that just getting underway will give you great returns. In fact, as the graph shows, even if you shift the needle from being very inactive or unfit, to being just in the lowest quarter of either ‘active’ or ‘fit people’ you achieve the greatest return on your investment! For example if you are in the lowest 10% of either ‘active’ or ‘fit’ people, you get very little protective effect; but if you move to the 25th percentile in activity levels, you get about a 10% protective effect, but a whopping 40% protective effect for being in the 25th percentile in FITNESS levels!!

Aerobic fitness is your best health predictor

Estimated relative risk of cardiovascular disease by fitness and physical activity.
Williams, PT (2001) MSSE 33:754-761.

Let me summarise the point I’m trying to  make: While being generally active (such as going for regular easy walks, etc) is good for your health, spending time getting FITTER will give you multiplied returns, in body composition, general capacity, and primarily in health, so you can get the most out of life for as long as possible! So if you are short on time, and have high expectations on your investments, then this makes a lot of sense. NOW, if you are concerned about increasing the intensity of your exercise due to health issues, or risk of injury, please get in touch with us. We have proven systems to improve your fitness in a safe and progressive manner.

I’d like to thank Associate Professor Lance Dalleck from Western State Colorado university for presenting to the iNform team and sharing his expertise on this topic.

About the Author

Finding Your Root Cause of PCOS

Finding Your Root Cause of PCOS

So you’ve been diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).

You might be sitting there wondering where to go from here? You FINALLY have an explanation for why you’ve been experiencing all those symptoms; hooray! This is good news (even if it doesn’t feel like it) because NOW you can do something about it.

 

Root cause of PCOS

Managing PCOS enables you to take back control of your life and it starts by finding the root cause driving your symptoms.

PCOS occurs when there is an imbalance of hormones in the body (this is what causes all those annoying symptoms you’ve been experiencing). So it makes sense the aim of managing your PCOS should be to determine what’s causing this imbalance and work towards re-balancing your hormones. 

 

 

Insulin Resistance & PCOS

This is the most common type of PCOS. Insulin resistance occurs when the body stops responding to insulin, and both sugar and insulin levels in the blood start to rise. High levels of insulin can stimulate androgen production, thus disturbing the normal balance of hormones.

A blood sugar test from your GP can determine whether you have insulin resistance. If insulin resistance is driving your PCOS it’s particularly important to adopt a healthy and nourishing diet, and exercise regularly to manage and improve your blood sugar levels.

 

Healthy food for PCOS

 

Inflammation & PCOS

Inflammation can be present in all types of PCOS. Things such as; stress, food sensitivities, poor gut health can lead to long term inflammation in the body. Long term inflammation can disrupt the body’s normal hormone levels and wreak havoc on both your physical and mental health.

Symptoms of inflammation are things like; fatigue, anxiety, IBS like symptoms, or joint pain (to name a few). If inflammation is the driver of your PCOS: determine your underlying source and start including positive lifestyle behaviours to support your body and manage your symptoms.

 

Movement for PCOS

 

Adrenal & PCOS

If you don’t fit the insulin resistant or inflammatory type PCOS you may be one of the few women who have an adrenal form of PCOS. This occurs when the ovaries function as normal but the adrenal glands produce androgens in response to “stress” which can then result in an imbalance of hormone.

A blood hormone test (testing for DHEA/DHEA-S) from your GP would help determine whether adrenal glands are functioning as normal. If your stress response system is driving your PCOS, learning to manage your stress and support your nervous system is vital!

 

Mindfullness for PCOS

 

Knowing your root cause can be a game changer when it comes to better managing your PCOS. Now you can work towards re-balancing your hormones, improving your symptoms, and get back to feeling better day to day! 

 

About the Author

 

 

Take Control of Your PCOS! How Exercise Can Help

Take Control of Your PCOS! How Exercise Can Help

PCOS can make you feel like you’re going insane! 

Some days are good, some are bad, and then there’s the days you just feel plain awful. It seems like nobody understands how you feel or what you’re going through, heck sometimes you don’t understand what’s going on and life feels out of control. Trust me when I say you’re not alone and trust me when I say there IS something you can do to take back control of your life!

 

What is PCOS?

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (or PCOS) occurs when there is an chronic imbalance of hormones in the body. This can cause havoc on the body and possible symptoms are; fatigue, bloating, hair loss or unwanted hair growth, acne, and weight gain.

 

What YOU can do about your PCOS?

So you may have been told to “lose 5-10% of your body weight” or “take these medications”, or if you have lean PCOS the classic “there’s nothing we can do, so just come back when you’re trying to get pregnant and we’ll help”. But let me tell you… there IS something YOU can do to help get your life back!

Exercise!

Now I’m not talking about going out and flogging yourself at the gym or running until you vomit. I’m talking about the kind of exercise to get your body moving, make you feel better, and improve your PCOS symptoms.

 

How will exercise help my PCOS?

Exercise can help you manage your PCOS in a number of ways such as;

  • Help to balance your hormones,
  • Reduce symptoms such as;
      • Bloating
      • Fatigue
      • Low moods, anxiety, and/or depression
      • Stress
  • Help regulate your periods and hence increase chance of pregnancy,
  • Manage your weight either by;
      • Reducing body weight by 5-10% (which helps improve symptoms and increase chance of pregnancy), or
      • Improve body composition by increasing muscle mass and maintaining a healthy level of fat (very important for ovulation!)

Along with a healthy diet, plenty of sleep, reducing stress, and learning to understand your cycle you can also improve acne, hair loss, unwanted hair, and improve overall well-being, and give you back some control in managing your PCOS.

 

 

Exercising for PCOS

So now you know why exercise is good for PCOS, but how should you add it into your life? Here is a bit of a guide…..

  • Aim for 30 minutes most days of the week of moderate aerobic exercise 

This is important for reducing inflammation in the body, and improving symptoms.

  • Add 2-3 strength training days into your week

This is important for improving body composition, increasing metabolic rate for weight loss, and supporting the body through pregnancy.

  • Find a form of exercise that you enjoy

This will make it much easier to stick with and reach your health goals, whether that’s gym exercises, pilates, group classes, running, swimming, aqua aerobics, cycling, dancing, hiking, there’s many ways to exercise so think big! 

  • And most importantly listen to your body!

Move in a way that will leave you feeling good, this may change how you exercise day to day, but it is important for long term recovery of your body.

 

There you have it, how you can take your health into your own hands and manage your PCOS. If you would like some more information or help in managing your PCOS contact one of our Exercise Physiologists and we will help you through your journey to better health.

About The Author

 

A client’s perspective on the Whoop health coach!

A client’s perspective on the Whoop health coach!

Hi, I’m Glenn, one of iNform’s clients and a new Whoop user. I’d love to give you a client’s perspective on the Whoop health coach!

By day I’m a desk jockey leading a small team within a big company. I drink way too much coffee, spend too much time in meetings, snack on bowls of cereal, raid the biscuit tin and lunch on whatever is quick and dirty. By night I’m a husband and father of three. Life is busy. Somewhere in there I try to fit in some exercise. The problem: I’m a washed-up age-group triathlete still trying to hit splits from 10 years ago. I just can’t exercise for fun, I need a challenge or a goal. All combined that puts me in a risky category: 95% zero physical activity and 5% full gas, nothing in between. Not surprisingly I became a yo-yo trainer – train, injury, repeat. That’s how I ended up at iNform!

So how does Whoop fit in to all of this? To me, Whoop is like your body’s credit card account balance. Your day to day activities are like withdrawals. Work and home stress, exercise, diet and general activity all drain your account. And just like a credit card you can’t keep withdrawing, you need to make repayments. That’s where sleep and recovery come in. If you keep withdrawing and don’t make enough repayments, the credit card interest catches up with you. Whoop gives you a running account balance to help you manage your life!

What have I learnt about ME so far?

  1. Sometimes I get to Friday night and I’m simply exhausted, wound-up and seriously cranky – I can see that in my recovery scores. This steady accumulation of work stress and exercise just doesn’t give me the chance to recover. Consecutive days of red zone is my trigger to course correct.
    2. Training in the heat (>35C) hurts me big time. My 7km Corporate Cup run around the Torrens in the heat registered an unusually high strain and took much longer to recover from. I even bounced back quicker from the Murray Man triathlon (1.9km swim, 90km bike, 21km run).
    3. I get a pretty good and consistent sleep score these days. Interestingly though, more sleep doesn’t seem to be the silver recovery bullet for me. Active recovery, like an easy ride or a hike, seems to be the go.

So far, I’m loving it. It’s so simple yet so insightful – it’s just your heartbeat. While it’s somewhat concerning to see the direct impact that life’s strain has on your heart it’s also satisfying to see how your body responds to recovery. Whoop helps me quantify how my body is coping with life’s strain so I can course correct. After all, you can only manage what you measure!

And finally, one for the triathletes. Glenn’s Triathlon Trip #1: If you struggle to get into your wetsuit, try putting a plastic bag over your hand or foot before you slip it into the arm or leg hole.

 

Click here for more information on our Whoop health coaching service.