Should I Exercise With An Injury?

Should I Exercise With An Injury?

Should I exercise with an injury? In this article we answer this age old question and provide some practical tips that you can implement immediately.

Training is going well.

You are getting in the gym a few times per week, the weights are going up, and you are feeling better.

Then boom, disaster strikes.

Injury.

Seriously, there is nothing that can derail your progress quite like an injury.

It not only makes it harder to exercise, but depending on the type of injury, it may even make something as simple as getting off the couch seem like climbing mount Everest.

Combine that with the fact that an injury can also destroy your motivation, and you have a recipe for disaster.

But does it have to be this way? Does an injury have to derail your progress?

Which begs the question — should I exercise with an injury, or should I rest and wait for it to heal?

 

Should I Exercise With An Injury?

So, you get injured.

What next?

In my personal opinion, stopping exercise is the absolute worst thing you can do.

I mean, as far as I am concerned, this whole ‘fitness’ thing is a simple game of attrition.

You show up, you do the work, and you build momentum. Over time, actually showing up gets easier, and you start to enjoy this whole ‘exercise’ thing.

You begin to push yourself, not because your trainer tells you too, but because you want to see what you are capable of.

And then the results start to come rolling in.

With this in mind, I would argue that even in the face of injury, you should definitely keep exercising.

In fact, it would be silly not too.

Which leads us to our next point quite nicely…

 

How Should I Exercise With An Injury?

While I am a huge proponent of keeping that exercise momentum going, your exercise routine should change in the face of an injury.

 

1. Avoid Aggravating Exercises

First and foremost, you need to avoid any exercises that aggravate the injury like the plague.

  • This means that if you have a knee injury, squats and lunges might be out of the question
  • A shoulder injury may mean that you need to avoid all pressing movements for the time being
  • And a lower back injury might mean that you avoid heavy squats and deadlifts for a couple of weeks.

This first step doesn’t have to be hard — hell, I could probably summarize it by simply saying “don’t be stupid“.

While this may be viewed as a negative step, it shouldn’t be.

In fact, this may actually give you an opportunity to get better at some movements you don’t normally spend much time with — which will only benefit you in the long run.

 

2. Double Down on Exercises That Feel Good

Step number two rolls on quite nicely from step number one, and really, it just makes sense.

Those movements that don’t cause you pain?

Train them hard, train them heavy, and train them often.

Use the opportunity to build strength in different movements and prioritize the growth of certain muscle groups.

In short, have fun with it.

 

 

3. Get it Checked Out

And finally, if your injury has been around for more than a couple of days and doesn’t seem to be getting any better, get it checked out by a professional (chiropractor, physio etc.).

There is a genuine possibility that your injury might benefit from:

  1. Some hands on treatment, or
  2. Some specific rehabilitation exercises

And a health professional can help you with both — which will ultimately get you back to 100% as soon as possible.

 

Take Home Message

While getting an injury is far from a good thing, it should not derail your progress.

By making some smart adjustments to your training you can keep exercising, and more importantly, keep seeing progress.

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The 7 Best Upper Body Exercises (Or, My Favorite Upper Body Exercises)

The 7 Best Upper Body Exercises (Or, My Favorite Upper Body Exercises)

In this article I outlined what I think are the best 7 upper body exercises on the planet. Seriously, give them a go and watch the gains come rolling in!

Only last week I wrote an article outlining my 7 favorite lower body exercises.

So I figured I might as well do the same with some upper body exercises.

As I alluded to in that previous article, I have been training my upper body for a fairly long time (much longer than my lower body, to be honest…).

The term ‘meathead’ would be an apt description.

However, because of this, I have had the opportunity to experiment with a number of different exercises over the years. Some of which I have found some to be much better than others.

It is these exercises that I have then used with my clients (with great success, I might add) — and it is these exercises that I am now passing onto you.

So, without further ado — and in no particular order — what I believe to be the 7 best upper body exercises.

 

1. Landmine Press

Boy oh boy do I love me a landmine press.

While this great exercises is not as sexy as a bench press, nor as handsome as a bicep curl, it does offer one serious point of difference.

Functionality.

The landmine press is one of the few exercises that allows your shoulder blade to move freely during the pressing motion, and therefore replicating how it acts in real world settings.

This has obvious carryover to tasks of daily living and a myriad of upper body performance tasks (things like throwing comes to mind).

As a bonus, because the landmine can move laterally, this exercise also improves shoulder stability. This is important, as it can directly enhance shoulder health, while also preventing injuries.

Oh, and I should also mention that because your shoulder moves freely during this movement, it is super shoulder friendly — making it perfect for those of you with cranky shoulders.

 

2. Inverted Row

The inverted row is one of the few exercises that feature in most of my clients programs, most of the time.

And for good reason too.

The inverted row is a horizontal rowing variation that targets all of the muscles of the upper back. This makes it perfect for improving posture and reversing many of the nasty side effects that come with sitting.

As an added bonus, it can be performed on a number of different pieces of equipment, including in a squat rack, on a smith machine, or even using a TRX.

 

3. Push Up

You didn’t expect me to leave the push up off this list did you?

Good — because I simply couldn’t.

Like the landmine press, the push up allows your shoulder to move freely, which makes it very shoulder friendly.

With this in mind, when performed properly, the push up offers a great way to improve should stability, as well enhance core endurance and increase upper body strength.

The trick lies with making sure you perform them properly…

And finally, they can also be loaded easily with the addition of weight plates and bands (so no, they are not just a ‘beginner’ exercise…).

 

4. Single Arm Dumbbell Row

I have a very special place in my heart for dumbbell rows.

Not only are they a great way to increase upper body strength, enhance shoulder function, and improve posture (all simultaneously), but I am pretty sure they are the reason I put any muscle on my upper back when I first started training.

And really, isn’t that enough?

I personally like performing dumbbell rows with both feet firmly planted on the ground, while supporting my upper body on a bench. When done in this way they also increase core engagement, which can only be a good thing.

 

5. Chin Up

I can picture it now.

The year is 2036, and the zombie apocalypse is finally upon us. I sprint through the streets. Lungs burning, I seek any means of escape. A thousand pair of feet shuffle quickly behind me. Groans fill the air. The taste of fear is thick in my mouth.

The cold embrace of death inches closer by the second.

Then I see it.

Down an alley way to my left, a small balcony. Slightly above head height — I think I can make it.

I turn sharply, moving down the alley as fast as I can.

Launching myself up towards the ledge, I panic — I’m not going to make it.

Somehow my fingers make contact.

I manage to hang on.

With my feet scrambling and my heart pounding, I drag myself up, arms screaming all the while.

As I slide the final few inches, I feel a hand scrape the bottom of my shoe.

The angry shrieks of the undead ring in my ears.

I will live another day.

Thanks to chin ups.

In all seriousness, being able to perform even a single chin up with solid technique is a clear demonstration of upper body strength. It also means that you can control your own body through space, which is important when it comes to managing life on a daily basis.

More importantly, the chin up itself is great way to train all the muscles of your back, and it improves core stability.

In short, it makes you a strong and resilient human being.

 

 

6. Dumbbell Bench Press

I simply could not do it — I had to chuck in a bench press variation.

And while the dumbbell bench press is not quite as snazzy as a traditional barbell bench, it is arguably a much more readily available alternative.

The dumbbell bench press allows you to keep your shoulders in a nice neutral position, which makes it very shoulder friendly.

More importantly, it trains the muscles of the chest and hammers the triceps — so you know, beach muscles and stuff.

The strength developed in the bench press has a lot of carryover to various tasks of daily living (like getting yourself up from the floor) and a number of athletic based movements (think of Dustin Martins don’t argue).

In  short, its good.

Yeah, I guess I’m a fan.

 

7. Single Arm Cable Row

And last (but certainly not least) we have the single arm cable row.

If you have ever trained at iNform, then there is a very good chance that you have done one of these bad boys during a session.

They not only offer a great way to train all the muscles of your back, but they also require you to rotate your thoracic spine. This improves your thoracic mobility, which can help enhance shoulder health and reduce lower back pain.

Importantly, as the exercise is unilateral (AKA uses one arm at a time), it is also perfect for ironing out any strength asymmetries you may have.

Talk about bang-for-your-buck.

 

Take Home Message

And boom — there you have it — 7 of the best upper body exercises on the planet.

Chuck these in your program and watch all the gain train come rolling in.

About the Author

The 7 Best Lower Body Exercises (AKA My Favorite Lower Body Exercises)

The 7 Best Lower Body Exercises (AKA My Favorite Lower Body Exercises)

In this article I outline what I believe to the 7 best lower body exercises on the planet. Seriously, they are that good — so get them in your program.

When I first stepped foot into the gym, I did very little lower body strength work.

In fact, I did none.

I was adamant that running was enough to ‘keep my legs strong’.

To be honest, I was only in the gym to build some muscle, and lets face it — who cares about legs?

How naive I was…

But fortunately, things change, and as a result I began to see the benefits of training my lower body.

Over the years my love for lower body strength training has blossomed into a bit of a fetish. I am a vocal believer that everyone should strength train. And more importantly, I believe that everyone should prioritize exercises that strengthen their lower body.

As you age, your lower body strength is one of the first things things to decline. It is this decline that impairs your ability to perform normal tasks of daily living, lowers your quality of life, and simply makes everything harder.

Additionally, lower body strength is the foundation from which all other areas of performance are built. This means that if you want to sprint fast, change direction rapidly, run or cycle long distances, or play any type of sport, lower body strength is essential.

Which is why I am sharing what I believe to be the 7 best lower body exercises on the planet.

Now, just to be clear, these are not in any particular order. In fact, they are all great exercises in their own right, and they all deserve a place in your training program.

So, without further ado – the 7 best lower body exercises.

 

1. Bulgarian Split Squat

The Bulgarian split squat not only has a cool name, but also offers a great way to improve lower body strength and single leg stability. In this manner, it is one of the most bang for your buck exercises on the planet.

This makes it perfect for anyone who wants to sprint faster, change direction quicker, or simply navigate life’s many daily challenges easier.

As a bit of a bonus, it can easily be loaded with barbells, kettlebells, or dumbbells, making it super versatile.

 

2. Front Squat

Many people describe the barbell back squat as the king of all exercises — and its not far from the truth.

However, for 99% of the population, I prefer its handsome younger brother, the front squat.

With the front squat, the bar sits on the front of the shoulders, rather than on the back. This allows you to maintain a more upright position during the movement, making it more back friendly. This also forces more core engagement, and typically helps people sink a little bit lower.

As a result, it has great carry over to almost any real life task you can think of — especially those related to athletic performance, such as jumping and sprinting.

in short, front squat it like its hot.

 

3. Trap Bar Deadlift

Anyone who knows me knows I like to deadlift. I honestly think everyone should deadlift in some way, shape, or form.

It is the perfect exercise to build lower body strength. It places a premium on all the muscles of your posterior chain (think glutes and hamstrings). It even hammers all the muscles of your upper back.

As a result, it not only offers a great way to strengthen the lower body, but also improve your posture.

However, the traditional barbell deadlift can be quite challenging for a lot of people.

Which is exactly why I like the trap bar deadlift.

As the bar sits slightly higher than a normal barbell, it is more accessible (especially for those with mobility limitations). Additionally, the shape of the bar helps you keep a slightly more upright posture, which places less load on the lower back.

What more could you want?

 

4. Reverse Lunge

I am massive fan of exercises that not only build strength and stability, but also do so in a functionally relevant manner.

Which is exactly where the reverse lunge enters the discussion.

Like many other single leg exercises, the reverse lunge improves single leg stability. However, as it has you driving forward from the bottom position, it better replicates things like running, sprinting, jumping, and walking up stairs.

Even better, because it has you stepping backwards to initiate the movement (rather than forward like many other lunging variations), it makes it easier to load into the hip. This means that it tends to increase the work done by your glutes, while reducing the load on the knee.

 

 

5. Lateral Step Down

The lateral step down is the perfect way to improve single leg stability while moving in a lateral direction. With this in mind, it offers benefits for almost anyone on the planet.

The key with this exercise is to leave your ego at the door!

The load does not have to be heavy — in fact, it probably shouldn’t be. The key is to focus on slowing down the descent and keeping it smooth and controlled.

 

6. Single Leg Deadlift

As if I was going to leave this guy out.

If you have ever trained at iNform, then you would know that we are a big fan of single leg deadlift variations. They are the perfect way to improve hip strength and single leg stability, which is why they appear in so many of our programs.

To add to the appeal, they an be loaded using almost any piece of equipment, and can be performed assisted if balance is an issue.

Talk about versatile.

 

7. Barbell Hip Thrust

Last but not least, we have the hip thrust.

Popularized by the glute guy himself, Bret Contreras, this is a great exercises that absolutely smokes the glutes.

As a result, it offers a great way to improve athletic performance, help improve lower back pain, and build a sweet booty.

Seriously, what more could you want?

 

Take Home Message

Improving the strength of your lower body is a surefire way to improve your performance, function, and even quality of life — and the key lies with making sure you do it right.

Which is exactly why I have outlined what I believe to be the best 7 lower body exercises.

Start incorporating these guys into your training ASAP, and reap the rewards.

About The Author

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do I Need To Deadlift From the Floor? Tips for Perfect Deadlift Technique.

Do I Need To Deadlift From the Floor? Tips for Perfect Deadlift Technique.

The deadlift is one hell of an exercise — but does that mean you should deadlift from the floor?

Lets find out.

In my opinion, the deadlift is one of the best exercises on the planet.

I mean, when it comes to whole body strength, it is king:

  • It works every single muscle in the body (with a heavy emphasis on your legs and upper back)
  • Has great carryover to athletic performance tasks (think jumping and sprinting)
  • Improves your ability to perform various tasks of daily living
  • Builds a sweet set of buns

Seriously, what more could you want?

However, with these amazing positives, there is one big fat caveat that we need to consider.

It needs to be performed with damn good technique.

See, the deadlift is pretty complex movement.

Moreover, the way in which the bar is positioned during a deadlift (in front of your body) means that it naturally places a lot of shear stress on your spine.

Now, to be clear, this is not a bad thing.

When the deadlift is performed correctly, this shear stress strengthens the muscles of your back and trunk. And the result? Over time your back becomes more stable, and less injury prone.

But, if your deadlift technique is poor, then this shear stress is not going to be a good thing.

In fact, it may even result in injury.

What we could only consider ‘not so good’ (AKA my eyes are bleeding) deadlift technique

 

Good Deadlift Technique (AKA How to Deadlift)

What does good deadlift technique look like?

While there may be some slight variances in deadlift technique between individuals (things like stance width and hand position, for example), there a few general rules that must be adhered to at all times.

These include:

  • Your whole foot making even contact with the ground
  • Armpits positioned over the bar
  • Back in a neutral position
  • Head in line with spine (so not looking too far up or down)
  • Bar positioned over your shoe laces
  • Hips back, feeling a whole lot of tension in your hamstrings

If you tick these six boxes, then you are in the prime position to perform a safe and efficient deadlift.

And it should look a little something like this (performed by yours truly):

But (there is always a but…), it does need to be said that not everyone will have the mobility required to get into the bottom position of a deadlift safely.

Which begs the question…

 

Do I Need To Deadlift From the Floor?

In short, no — you do not.

While I am a firm believer that everyone should deadlift in some way, shape, or form, I also believe that you need to tailor an individuals exercise prescription to their current capabilities.

This means that very few people will actually be able to perform a barbell deadlift from the floor.

Or at least in the initial stages of their training journey anyway.

Which is fine.

See, we have a myriad of deadlift variations available to us that offer the same benefits. Importantly, most of them are easier to perform than a traditional barbell deadlift, as they don’t require quite as much mobility.

In short, they are harder to stuff up.

Then over time (as you become more competent at the movement), you can gradually transition into performing a deadlift from the floor.

Genius.

 

 

The Best Deadlift Variations

With this in mind, I thought I would outline my favourite deadlift variations.

I normally prescribe each of these in the order listed for 4-6 weeks each (before moving onto the next one), for 3 sets of 8-12 repetitions, twice per week.

By the end of the process, you will be in a very good position to start deadlifting from the floor

  1. Elevated Kettlebell Deadlift
  2. Sumo Kettlebell Deadlift
  3. Trap Bar Deadlift
  4. Romanian Deadlift
  5. Conventional Deadlift from Blocks
  6. Sumo Deadlift

As I am sure you can see, these exercises become gradually more challenging.

In this manner, each progressive variation requires a little more mobility, and becomes a little more complex.

However, once you have spent a good 4-6 weeks training each of them you will have your deadlift pattern down pat.

As a result, you will be primed to start deadlifting from the floor!

 

Take Home Message

The deadlift is an incredible exercise, however, there is no need to perform it from the floor if it sits outside your current capabilities. In fact, you can perform a number of deadlift variations and get exactly the same benefits.

So give some of the variations listed in this article a go, and make sure to let us know what you think!

 

About The Author

 

 

Should I Workout When I’m Sick?

Should I Workout When I’m Sick?

Should I workout when I’m sick?

You would be amazed how often I hear this question. At least once a week I will get a message from a client who are feeling a little under the weather. Saying that they are unsure if they should come in and train, or not.

And — like most things in the health industry — it depends.

 

Should I workout when I’m sick?

I get it.

You have finally gotten into a solid training routine. Finally gotten in a couple consistent weeks of exercise. Your feeling good, seeing progress, and making change.

And boom — disaster strikes.

A head cold, a runny nose, or even a mild cough.

But are these enough to stop you from working out, or should you just push through?

 

The “above the neck” rule

When it comes to working out when sick, I tend to stick with what is known as the “above the neck” rule.

This rule simply suggests that if you are strictly experiencing symptoms above your neck, then you are probably fine to exercise. This means that if you have a head cold, a stuffy nose, or a mild earache, you are good to go.

However, if your symptoms extend below the neck (think a chest cough, fever, vomiting, or diarrhoea) then you might want to give it a miss.

Simple.

 

How do I know for sure?

Now, while the above the neck rule does provide a simple way of telling whether you should workout or not, it isn’t always 100% accurate.

See, when you are sick, your body is working overtime to get better. It needs extra energy to support your immune system, and often extra rest as well. With this in mind, it is important to remember that exercise places your body under more stress that it needs to recover from.

This can obviously impair your ability to heal.

As a result, even if all your symptoms are above the neck, there are still times when you might want to avoid exercise. These include:

If you fall into one of these categories, give your session a skip and get some rest.

 

 

But what about my gains?

But what about my gains?

One of the most common reasons people want to keep training (even when they are sick) is because they don’t want to lose their fitness.

And I get it.

I mean, you have spent all this time training diligently, and now its all going down the toilet — right?

Well, not quite. See, you will be happy to know that it actually takes a decent amount of time to lose fitness.

In fact, if you stop exercising completely, you wont start losing strength or muscle mass until around your third week without exercise. Similarly, it is unlikely you will see any loss of endurance or aerobic fitness until after your second week without exercise.

Note here that I said if you “stop exercising completely”.

Positively, if you can even get in one training session per week, your loss  of strength and fitness will be attenuated significantly. This means that if you have a day where you are feeling good, you can sneak in a light session to avoid any losses of fitness occurring.

In short, you have nothing to worry about!

 

Take Home Message

Should I workout when I’m sick? Well, I think we have answered that question pretty comprehensively.

In my mind, adhering to the above the neck rule is a great place to start. However, if you are simply not feeling up to it, or exercise makes your symptoms worse, then you should probably give it a miss for now.

And no, you don’t need to worry about losing all your gains, because that wont start to happen until week 3 without exercise — so make sure you take some time to recover if you need it!

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