Finding Your Root Cause of PCOS

Finding Your Root Cause of PCOS

So you’ve been diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS).

You might be sitting there wondering where to go from here? You FINALLY have an explanation for why you’ve been experiencing all those symptoms; hooray! This is good news (even if it doesn’t feel like it) because NOW you can do something about it.

 

Root cause of PCOS

Managing PCOS enables you to take back control of your life and it starts by finding the root cause driving your symptoms.

PCOS occurs when there is an imbalance of hormones in the body (this is what causes all those annoying symptoms you’ve been experiencing). So it makes sense the aim of managing your PCOS should be to determine what’s causing this imbalance and work towards re-balancing your hormones. 

 

 

Insulin Resistance & PCOS

This is the most common type of PCOS. Insulin resistance occurs when the body stops responding to insulin, and both sugar and insulin levels in the blood start to rise. High levels of insulin can stimulate androgen production, thus disturbing the normal balance of hormones.

A blood sugar test from your GP can determine whether you have insulin resistance. If insulin resistance is driving your PCOS it’s particularly important to adopt a healthy and nourishing diet, and exercise regularly to manage and improve your blood sugar levels.

 

Healthy food for PCOS

 

Inflammation & PCOS

Inflammation can be present in all types of PCOS. Things such as; stress, food sensitivities, poor gut health can lead to long term inflammation in the body. Long term inflammation can disrupt the body’s normal hormone levels and wreak havoc on both your physical and mental health.

Symptoms of inflammation are things like; fatigue, anxiety, IBS like symptoms, or joint pain (to name a few). If inflammation is the driver of your PCOS: determine your underlying source and start including positive lifestyle behaviours to support your body and manage your symptoms.

 

Movement for PCOS

 

Adrenal & PCOS

If you don’t fit the insulin resistant or inflammatory type PCOS you may be one of the few women who have an adrenal form of PCOS. This occurs when the ovaries function as normal but the adrenal glands produce androgens in response to “stress” which can then result in an imbalance of hormone.

A blood hormone test (testing for DHEA/DHEA-S) from your GP would help determine whether adrenal glands are functioning as normal. If your stress response system is driving your PCOS, learning to manage your stress and support your nervous system is vital!

 

Mindfullness for PCOS

 

Knowing your root cause can be a game changer when it comes to better managing your PCOS. Now you can work towards re-balancing your hormones, improving your symptoms, and get back to feeling better day to day! 

 

About the Author

 

 

Take Control of Your PCOS! How Exercise Can Help

Take Control of Your PCOS! How Exercise Can Help

PCOS can make you feel like you’re going insane! 

Some days are good, some are bad, and then there’s the days you just feel plain awful. It seems like nobody understands how you feel or what you’re going through, heck sometimes you don’t understand what’s going on and life feels out of control. Trust me when I say you’re not alone and trust me when I say there IS something you can do to take back control of your life!

 

What is PCOS?

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (or PCOS) occurs when there is an chronic imbalance of hormones in the body. This can cause havoc on the body and possible symptoms are; fatigue, bloating, hair loss or unwanted hair growth, acne, and weight gain.

 

What YOU can do about your PCOS?

So you may have been told to “lose 5-10% of your body weight” or “take these medications”, or if you have lean PCOS the classic “there’s nothing we can do, so just come back when you’re trying to get pregnant and we’ll help”. But let me tell you… there IS something YOU can do to help get your life back!

Exercise!

Now I’m not talking about going out and flogging yourself at the gym or running until you vomit. I’m talking about the kind of exercise to get your body moving, make you feel better, and improve your PCOS symptoms.

 

How will exercise help my PCOS?

Exercise can help you manage your PCOS in a number of ways such as;

  • Help to balance your hormones,
  • Reduce symptoms such as;
      • Bloating
      • Fatigue
      • Low moods, anxiety, and/or depression
      • Stress
  • Help regulate your periods and hence increase chance of pregnancy,
  • Manage your weight either by;
      • Reducing body weight by 5-10% (which helps improve symptoms and increase chance of pregnancy), or
      • Improve body composition by increasing muscle mass and maintaining a healthy level of fat (very important for ovulation!)

Along with a healthy diet, plenty of sleep, reducing stress, and learning to understand your cycle you can also improve acne, hair loss, unwanted hair, and improve overall well-being, and give you back some control in managing your PCOS.

 

 

Exercising for PCOS

So now you know why exercise is good for PCOS, but how should you add it into your life? Here is a bit of a guide…..

  • Aim for 30 minutes most days of the week of moderate aerobic exercise 

This is important for reducing inflammation in the body, and improving symptoms.

  • Add 2-3 strength training days into your week

This is important for improving body composition, increasing metabolic rate for weight loss, and supporting the body through pregnancy.

  • Find a form of exercise that you enjoy

This will make it much easier to stick with and reach your health goals, whether that’s gym exercises, pilates, group classes, running, swimming, aqua aerobics, cycling, dancing, hiking, there’s many ways to exercise so think big! 

  • And most importantly listen to your body!

Move in a way that will leave you feeling good, this may change how you exercise day to day, but it is important for long term recovery of your body.

 

There you have it, how you can take your health into your own hands and manage your PCOS. If you would like some more information or help in managing your PCOS contact one of our Exercise Physiologists and we will help you through your journey to better health.

About The Author