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I sat glued to my television tonight watching the first ever women’s AFL game. I am in awe! Awe of the strong, fast, resilient women who have worked exceptionally hard behind the scenes to put this spectacle on. Awe in the spectators who have come out in their thousands to watch the game and even awe in the AFL (who I have ragged on, on many an occasion) for getting the league up and running. I will add that this is also the feeling when I watch the WBBL and the netball leagues.
Now I love sport and everything it brings but I also realize sport can be perceived as just a competition where people either chase the ball or each other to win (usually just for sheep stations). For some people, sport is not very interesting (crazy, i know). But I view this momentous moment as more thatn just another game of sport. Why?
Well let’s skip forward a little bit…
Currently as it stands only 9 per cent of girls aged 12-14 year old reached the minimum daily physical activity guidelines (which is less than half of the 20 per cent of boys reaching the standard.) This decreases to 6 per cent of 15-17 year old girls. NOT GOOD!
 But I digress…
Even though women started playing competitively in the 1920’s, this game has always been regarded as a ‘man’s game’. Up until 2004, girls could play in boy’s team until 12 years of age but then that was it. They either transitioned to open women’s games or they didn’t play. Now with AFL being the biggest sport in Australia participation wise and easily the most visible in the media, saying to girls you can’t play anymore is a pretty big negative.
Now if we have the most influential sport discouraging women to stop moving, it is not surprising that research shows that girls lag behind boys in their movement skills, balance and physical activity and that the gender gap only widens as girls get older. Then those women have children and those young kids see their mum’s being inactive and the vicious cycle continues. We previously discussed this in our previous blog Do your kids see you sweat.
So yes! AFL, SOCCER, cricket, netball, softball, hockey can all help us lead the way in teaching our girls that as females sweat and strength is great. It is something to be proud of rather than embarrassed about. As parents, we need to encourage it. Whatever movement our kids want to do, aid them in anyway you can. This can help build behaviours of physical and mental health.
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